Mixed Masonry started in France in the late nineteenth century to correct a flaw in the interpretation of the traditional “landmarks,” which are the fundamental principles, of Freemasonry.

That flaw was the exclusion of women from the order.

Although women have long been admitted to Masonic practices in various ways, the International Masonic Order DELPHI is dedicated to complete equality between the sexes, as well as among all races and religions.

In the early 1880s a French lodge of masculine Freemasons determined to carry out Masonic principles of equality with consistency, and therefore initiated a woman. As a result of that act of conscience, a few years later a new lodge was formed in Paris, from which eventually developed several Orders of Freemasonry that admit men and women equally as well as several all-women Orders.

The International Masonic Order DELPHI is a twenty-first-century reform that practices traditional Masonry, but with a conscious realization of its inner, esoteric, psychological and spiritual significance as a contemporary expression of the Mysteries. It admits into its fellowship all properly prepared persons on equal footing, without distinction of race, religion, or gender.